Kitchen Renovation Planning: Mixed Media Flooring

Kitchen Renovation Planning 2015 has officially begun, so I find myself pouring over idea boards, DIY tutorials and all things design. This kitchen is going to be a dream {fingers crossed} and we want to do it right, but we also want to do it smart; saving in areas where we can do the work ourselves and spending on things that are important to us.

Right now I’m looking into flooring options. Our house has almost-new hardwood floors and while they’re not what I’d have picked myself, they’re in great condition and I’m perfectly happy to continue living with them. The kitchen, however, is tile. I’d originally thought that we’d just match the existing hardwood and make the floor seamless since it will ultimately be one giant open space, but after doing a little design research I stumbled across an even better solution: mixed media seamless hardwood to tile room transitions. There’s nothing particularly new about mixed media flooring, except when it comes to the layout…and that’s where things get interesting.

Here are a few of the ideas I’m currently crushing on. I see a fun hexagon pattern in my kitchen’s future. I’m so trendy ;) Look for source links at the bottom of each photo. Enjoy!

Mixed Media: Hardwood to Tile Flooring Transitions || House. Food. Baby.

Via Remodelista 

Mixed Media: Hardwood to Tile Flooring Transitions || House. Food. Baby.

Via Style Me Pretty

Mixed Media: Hardwood to Tile Flooring Transitions || House. Food. Baby.

Via KNSTRCT

Mixed Media: Hardwood to Tile Flooring Transitions || House. Food. Baby.

Via VOSGESPARIS

 

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Let There Be Light…Living Room Edition

Let There Be Light...Living Room Edition || House. Food. Baby.

After almost a year without it, we have light in the living room!

The original floor plan for our house had the living room in the front, followed by a kitchen and then a small dining area. We knew before we moved in that we’d be using the dining room as the living room and the living room as the dining room. We plan to do some major renovations on this floor, but until those renovations occur, this little switcheroo posed a few minor issues having to do with light.

Let There Be Light...Living Room Edition || House. Food. Baby.

The “dining room” had a chandelier. If we’d kept the home in its staged condition, I wouldn’t have been able to live with that dining room light. Yuck! But, in the living room situation it was definitely not going to work. The dining room light had to go.

We took it down, capped the wires and closed it off with a plate. The problem is that this room gets very little light. I’m not a huge fan of overhead light in general, but we needed more than a table lamp in the space.

So, I searched high and low for a light that was architecturally pleasing while remaining somewhat minimal. After we added the built-in bookcase, I didn’t want something that would distract, but rather add to the space and the cool new bookcase feature. I had settled on finding a small Moravian star.

Let There Be Light...Living Room Edition || House. Food. Baby.

So during a 20% off holiday sale at World Market I spotted this guy! OMG!!! The most awesome little light on the block and at just under 12″ it was the perfect size for the space. I sent it to my mom: “You can buy me this for Christmas!” She took the hint and ran with it and on Christmas morning I opened it with stars in my eyes.

Let There Be Light...Living Room Edition || House. Food. Baby.

I love it even more than I thought I would. It adds such a cool little feature to the space and even though we hardly use it as a light, it’s a cool little piece of art hanging in front of our bookcase.

Let There Be Light...Living Room Edition || House. Food. Baby.

I still want a window behind the couch {when are we ever happy} but this little light will suffice for now.

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Rustic Waterfall Edge Bench

Most of the large wood projects I’m doing these days are prototypes for furniture we’ll be building for the restaurant, so my house is quickly turning into a test kitchen of sorts.

Rustic Waterfall Edge Bench || House. Food. Baby.

I love the way this bench turned out, but if it ends up not working for the finished space, I’ll have no issues building something new.

Rustic Waterfall Edge Bench || House. Food. Baby.

This bench is the first addition to the plan we have for our new entryway. The wall to the right will be disappearing over the next 6 months when we start our kitchen renovation, which will open up the space, but require new storage elements in order to continue functioning properly.

The new kitchen will have white uppers and a dark midnight blue base, plus we’ll have lots of open storage with raw wood floating shelves, so in order to tie the entryway to the kitchen space I want to have a mix of closed white cabinets and open raw wood shelves, which is why I decided to move the existing bench, an Ikea Expedit Shelving Hack, and build a new, raw wood bench instead.

Rustic Waterfall Edge Bench || House. Food. Baby.

Rustic Waterfall Edge Bench Supplies & Cut List:
  • Table saw {you can also use a circular saw, but table saw will be easier}
  • Drill
  • Palm sander
  • 1/2″ Countersink bit
  • 2 1/2″ Kreg screws
  • 3″ Construction screws
  • 1/2″ Wood plugs
  • Sandpaper {120 and 220 grit}
  • Wood Glue
  • Wood putty
  • (1) 2 x 12 board cut @ 45″ {45 degree mitered edge}
  • (1) 2 x 6 board cut @ 45″{45 degree mitered edge}
  • (4) 2 x 6 board cut @ 18 1/2″ {45 degree mitered edge}

**I used some old cedar boards that I had on hand, but you can use any whitewood, poplar or pine boards that you can pick up at any big box home improvement store.

Rustic Waterfall Edge Bench || House. Food. Baby.

Cut your boards down to size using a table saw set to cut at a 45 degree angle.

Use a Kreg jig to drill pocket holes on the inside edge of your widest board, your 2 x 12 cut at 45″ long. You’re going to join both of your 45″ long boards to make the seat top. Use wood glue and 2 1/2″ Kreg screws to join these two pieces together.

Once you have your seat, you can set to work on adding your legs. I chose to modify the traditional waterfall edge design by making (4) legs with a small space in the middle. It still maintains that seamless waterfall edge, but has a bit of character as well. You’ll want to pre-drill your holes and use a countersink bit so that you can hide your screws later. Use clamps and wood glue and 3″ construction screws. I drilled (3) holes into the top and (2) into the side.

Rustic Waterfall Edge Bench || House. Food. Baby.

Pop your  wood plugs into the screws holes and tap into place and then use wood putty to fix any cracks, and smooth all of your edges.

Rustic Waterfall Edge Bench || House. Food. Baby.

Use a palm sander to sand your entire piece using 120 grit and then finishing with a 220 grit.

Rustic Waterfall Edge Bench || House. Food. Baby.

Now: Waterfall Edge Bench

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