Rustic Waterfall Edge Bench

Most of the large wood projects I’m doing these days are prototypes for furniture we’ll be building for the restaurant, so my house is quickly turning into a test kitchen of sorts.

Rustic Waterfall Edge Bench || House. Food. Baby.

I love the way this bench turned out, but if it ends up not working for the finished space, I’ll have no issues building something new.

Rustic Waterfall Edge Bench || House. Food. Baby.

This bench is the first addition to the plan we have for our new entryway. The wall to the right will be disappearing over the next 6 months when we start our kitchen renovation, which will open up the space, but require new storage elements in order to continue functioning properly.

The new kitchen will have white uppers and a dark midnight blue base, plus we’ll have lots of open storage with raw wood floating shelves, so in order to tie the entryway to the kitchen space I want to have a mix of closed white cabinets and open raw wood shelves, which is why I decided to move the existing bench, an Ikea Expedit Shelving Hack, and build a new, raw wood bench instead.

Rustic Waterfall Edge Bench || House. Food. Baby.

Rustic Waterfall Edge Bench Supplies & Cut List:
  • Table saw {you can also use a circular saw, but table saw will be easier}
  • Drill
  • Palm sander
  • 1/2″ Countersink bit
  • 2 1/2″ Kreg screws
  • 3″ Construction screws
  • 1/2″ Wood plugs
  • Sandpaper {120 and 220 grit}
  • Wood Glue
  • Wood putty
  • (1) 2 x 12 board cut @ 45″ {45 degree mitered edge}
  • (1) 2 x 6 board cut @ 45″{45 degree mitered edge}
  • (4) 2 x 6 board cut @ 18 1/2″ {45 degree mitered edge}

**I used some old cedar boards that I had on hand, but you can use any whitewood, poplar or pine boards that you can pick up at any big box home improvement store.

Rustic Waterfall Edge Bench || House. Food. Baby.

Cut your boards down to size using a table saw set to cut at a 45 degree angle.

Use a Kreg jig to drill pocket holes on the inside edge of your widest board, your 2 x 12 cut at 45″ long. You’re going to join both of your 45″ long boards to make the seat top. Use wood glue and 2 1/2″ Kreg screws to join these two pieces together.

Once you have your seat, you can set to work on adding your legs. I chose to modify the traditional waterfall edge design by making (4) legs with a small space in the middle. It still maintains that seamless waterfall edge, but has a bit of character as well. You’ll want to pre-drill your holes and use a countersink bit so that you can hide your screws later. Use clamps and wood glue and 3″ construction screws. I drilled (3) holes into the top and (2) into the side.

Rustic Waterfall Edge Bench || House. Food. Baby.

Pop your  wood plugs into the screws holes and tap into place and then use wood putty to fix any cracks, and smooth all of your edges.

Rustic Waterfall Edge Bench || House. Food. Baby.

Use a palm sander to sand your entire piece using 120 grit and then finishing with a 220 grit.

Rustic Waterfall Edge Bench || House. Food. Baby.

Now: Waterfall Edge Bench

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Modern Peg Rail Towel Hook

Remember that bathroom renovation reveal I promised this week? Well, it’s probably not going to happen. For the most part, the bathroom is done. Plumbing is hooked back up and we’re using it again, but one of my “experimental” projects was a failed experiment {what a surprise, right?}, so I’m making a few minor changes to the finishing touches before I show you the full reveal.

Modern Peg Rail Bathroom Hook || House. Food. Baby.

In the meantime, however, I’m going to give you another little teaser. I’m a fan of hooks in the bathroom. I like the way that towels look when they’re hanging from a hook, rather than draped over a towel bar. It’s just a matter of preference, really, but since peg rails are kind of my jam, I decided that was the way to go in this bathroom.

Modern Peg Rail Bathroom Hooks || House. Food. Baby.

However, this bathroom was full of some fabulous builder grade features, including a rubbed bronze towel bar {which I never photographed}. There wasn’t anything wrong with it, except that it was kind of boring. The biggest problem was that it had been very poorly hung…screwed directly into drywall, which destroyed the wall {I did get a photo of that, wah, wah}. It had to go.

Modern Peg Rail Towel Hook Supplies & Cut List:
  • Table saw
  • Circular saw
  • Drill
  • Kreg Jig
  • 1 1/4″ Kreg screws
  • Wood glue
  • Sandpaper {120 and 220 grit}
  • White paint
  • Paint brush
  • 1/2″ spade bit
  • 1/2″ countersink bit
  • 1 x 8 poplar board {ripped in half and cut to size – mine were 28″ long}
  • 1/2″ button top wood plugs
  • 3/4″ flat top wood buttons
  • 1/2″ poplar dowel – 4 pieces cut to 4″

Modern Peg Rail Bathroom Hook || House. Food. Baby.

Cut all of your pieces out. I used some leftover poplar that I ripped in half to make {2} 1 x 4s @ 32″ long. My dowels are cut to 4″ and I am using 4 on my peg rail.

Modern Peg Rail Bathroom Hook || House. Food. Baby.

Use your Kreg jig, create pocket holes on one side of your long poplar boards.

Modern Peg Rail Bathroom Hook || House. Food. Baby.

On the same board that your created your pocket holes, bore holes for your pegs using your 1/2″ spade bit. Gently sand all of your pieces and prepare to paint.

Modern Peg Rail Bathroom Hook || House. Food. Baby. Paint all of your pieces, including the flat and button top wood plugs. I used white paint, but you can leave it as is, stain it or even add a bright color depending on the space. After the last coat, I wet sanded using 600 grit sandpaper, but this is an optional step.

Modern Peg Rail Bathroom Hook || House. Food. Baby.

Use your Kreg screws, wood glue and clamps to join the two poplar boards together. Keep the clamps on until the glue has dried completely.

Modern Peg Rail Bathroom Hook || House. Food. Baby.

While the glue sets, add your dowels. Dab a small bit of wood glue to the edges and slide into the hole. Tap into place with a hammer and let dry.

Modern Peg Rail Bathroom Hook || House. Food. Baby.

Add your wood buttons by dabbing a small bit of glue to one side and pressing it gently onto the top of your dowel.

Modern Peg Rail Bathroom Hook || House. Food. Baby.

I let my peg rail set overnight and then the next day I beat the crap out of it using a hammer, nails, various tools, springs and sandpaper. I’m going for a rustic, farmhouse feel in the bathroom and this “old” look will match the sink cabinet as well. This is optional, of course. If that’s not your thing, the peg rail looks good without this added step. I didn’t take a photo of this until it was already up in the bathroom, hence the finished photo above.

Modern Peg Rail Bathroom Hook || House. Food. Baby.

Now it’s time to hang your peg rail! I drilled 3 holes into my rail, on either side and the center and then counter sunk my screws so I could finish it with button top wood plugs that I just tapped into place. They should fit snugly, but if you want to you can add some wood glue for extra security. **Make sure to attach your peg rail into studs.

Modern Peg Rail Bathroom Hook || House. Food. Baby.

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DIY House Number Plaque & Mailbox Upgrade

It takes a lot of work to make a house a home and sometimes those endless projects can feel overwhelming at times. We’re knee deep in a bathroom renovation right now, so the rest of our home has fell into disarray. You know how it goes, bathroom plumbing laying on the dining room table, toolbox on the coffee table, babies bath happening in the only working bathtub, up 2 flights of stairs…

DIY House Number Plaque & Mailbox Upgrade || House. Food. Baby.

It’s times like this when those simple, quick and easy projects are so satisfying. Case in point, our brand new house number plaque and mail box. Bam!

With a freshly painted front door, shutters, like-new mailbox and new house number plaque, the outside of our home is starting to look mighty happy these days.

House Number Plaque & Mailbox Upgrade Supply List:
  • Random poplar pieces {if you have cedar or teak on hand, that’s even better!}
  • Wood stain
  • Polyurethane {I used a spray}
  • House numbers {mine are existing, upcycled}
  • Mailbox {again, existing, upcycled}
  • Metal paint
  • 120-grit sandpaper
  • Wood glue
  • White vinegar
  • Dish soap
  • Clamps
  • 1 1/2″ construction screws

Remove and clean your mailbox. I used a vinegar and soap solution, 1 to 1, to wipe my mailbox and house numbers.

DIY House Number Plaque & Mailbox Upgrade || House. Food. Baby.

Grab a 120-grit sandpaper or block and rough up the metal on your mailbox and house numbers. This will help the paint to better adhere.

Use your metal spray paint to spray all the areas of your mailbox and house numbers {didn’t photograph this step…}, being sure to let them dry completely between each coat.

DIY House Number Plaque & Mailbox Upgrade || House. Food. Baby.

While your mailbox and numbers are drying, you can get to work on your plaque. I had a few pieces of poplar lying around from another project, so I just grabbed two of those. If you have cedar or teak, that would be even better, as they are naturally resistant to the elements. My pieces are 8″ x 2 1/2″ and 8″ x 1 3/4″, but you can do pretty much anything here as long as your numbers fit. It would be fun to go vertical, as well!

DIY House Number Plaque & Mailbox Upgrade || House. Food. Baby.

Attach your pieces together using wood glue and then clamp them overnight to dry.

DIY House Number Plaque & Mailbox Upgrade || House. Food. Baby.

Once your plaque is dry, remove the clamps and stain the plaque. I chose a dark oak stain because our house is off-white and our new doors are bright blue, so I thought this would be a nice pop and contrast. Let the stain dray and then spray the entire plaque with polyurethane. If you’re using teak or cedar, you can skip the poly.

DIY House Number Plaque & Mailbox Upgrade || House. Food. Baby.

Attach your house numbers to the plaque…

DIY House Number Plaque & Mailbox Upgrade || House. Food. Baby.

Attach your freshly painted mailbox and numbers plaque to your house!

Sometimes its those simple, quick projects that bring the most joy. What easy peasy upgrades have you made lately?

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